Archive for the ‘Heel Spur’ Category

Diagnosing Heel Spur

Heel Spur

Overview

Patients and doctors often confuse the terms heel spur and plantar fasciitis. While these two diagnoses are related, they are not the same. Plantar fasciitis refers to the inflammation of the plantar fascia–the tissue that forms the arch of the foot. A heel spur is a hook of bone that can form on the heel bone (calcaneus) and is associated with plantar fasciitis. About 70 percent of patients with plantar fasciitis have a heel spur that can be seen on an X-ray. However, many patients without symptoms of pain can have a heel spur. The exact relationship between plantar fasciitis and heel spurs is not entirely understood.

Causes

Diseases such as arthritis may lead to chronic inflammation in the tissue surrounding the heel and over time this can lead to the accumulation of calcium deposits. Ankylosing spondylitis, for example, is one particular form of arthritis that frequently develops along with heel spurs. This condition can damage bones all over the body and even lead to the fusion of spinal vertebrae.

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Some symptoms at the beginning of this condition include pain and swelling, and discomfort when pushing off with the toes during walking. This movement of the foot stretches the fascia that is already irritated and inflamed. If this condition is not treated, pain will be noticed in the heel when a heel spur develops in response to the stress. This is a common condition among athletes and others who run and jump a significant amount.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made using a few different technologies. X-rays are often used first to ensure there is no fracture or tumor in the region. Then ultrasound is used to check the fascia itself to make sure there is no tear and check the level of scar tissue and damage. Neurosensory testing, a non-painful nerve test, can be used to make sure there is not a local nerve problem if the pain is thought to be nerve related. It is important to remember that one can have a very large heel spur and no plantar fasciitis issues or pain at all, or one can have a great deal of pain and virtually no spur at all.

Non Surgical Treatment

Some heel spurs do require surgery, however surgery is a last resort. In most cases the patients underlying foot problem needs to be addressed, such as Over Pronation and Over Supination and Heel Pain Treatment Options need to be implemented if Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis are still an ongoing concern. Your best treatment is always prevention.

Surgical Treatment

Have surgery if no other treatments work. Before performing surgery, doctors usually give home treatments and improved footwear about a year to work. When nothing else eases the pain, here’s what you need to know about surgical options. Instep plantar fasciotomy. Doctors remove part of the plantar fascia to ease pressure on the nerves in your foot. Endoscopy. This surgery performs the same function as an instep plantar fasciotomy but uses smaller incisions so that you’ll heal faster. However, endoscopy has a higher rate of nerve damage, so consider this before you opt for this option. Be prepared to wear a below-the-knee walking cast to ease the pain of surgery and to speed the healing process. These casts, or “boots,” usually work better than crutches to speed up your recovery time.

Prevention

Choose new shoes that are the right size. Have your foot measured when you go to the shoe store instead of taking a guess about the size. Also, try on shoes at the end of the day or after a workout, when your feet are at their largest. To ensure a good fit, wear the same type of socks or nylons that you would normally wear with the type of shoe that you are trying on.

Advertisements

What Is A Calcaneal Spur

Calcaneal Spur

Overview

The heel spur (or calcaneal spur) is a nail-like growth of calcium around the ligaments and tendons of the foot where they attach to the heel bone. The spur grows from the bone and into the flesh of the foot. A heel spur results from an anatomical change of the calcaneus (heel bone). This involves the area of the heel and occasionally, another disability, such as arthritis. The heel bone forms one end of the two longitudinal arches of the foot. These arches are held together by ligaments and are activated by the muscles of the foot (some of which are attached beneath the arches and run from the front to the back of the foot). These muscles and ligaments, like the other supporting tissues of the body, are attached in two places. Many are attached at the heel bone. The body reacts to the stress at the heel bone by calcifying the soft tissue attachments and creating a spur.

Causes

Athletes who participate in sports that involve a significant amount of jumping and running on hard surfaces are most likely to suffer from heel spurs. Some other risk factors include poor form while walking which can lead to undue stress on the heel and its nerves and ligaments. Shoes that are not properly fitted for the wearer?s feet. Poor arch support in footwear. Being overweight. Occupations that require a lot of standing or walking. Reduced flexibility and the thinning of the fat pad along the bottom of the heel, both of which are a typical depreciation that comes with aging.

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Major symptoms consist of pain in the region surrounding the spur, which typically increases in intensity after prolonged periods of rest. Patients may report heel pain to be more severe when waking up in the morning. Patients may not be able to bear weight on the afflicted heel comfortably. Running, walking, or lifting heavy weight may exacerbate the issue.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made using a few different technologies. X-rays are often used first to ensure there is no fracture or tumor in the region. Then ultrasound is used to check the fascia itself to make sure there is no tear and check the level of scar tissue and damage. Neurosensory testing, a non-painful nerve test, can be used to make sure there is not a local nerve problem if the pain is thought to be nerve related. It is important to remember that one can have a very large heel spur and no plantar fasciitis issues or pain at all, or one can have a great deal of pain and virtually no spur at all.

Non Surgical Treatment

The key for the proper treatment of heel spurs is determining what is causing the excessive stretching of the plantar fascia. When the cause is over-pronation (flat feet), an orthotic with rearfoot posting and longitudinal arch support is an effective device to reduce the over-pronation, and allow the condition to heal. Other common treatments include stretching exercises, losing weight, wearing shoes that have a cushioned heel that absorbs shock, and elevating the heel with the use of a heel cradle, heel cup, or orthotic. Heel cradles and heel cups provide extra comfort and cushion to the heel, and reduce the amount of shock and shear forces experienced from everyday activities.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery involves releasing a part of the plantar fascia from its insertion in the heel bone, as well as removing the spur. Many times during the procedure, pinched nerves (neuromas), adding to the pain, are found and removed. Often, an inflamed sac of fluid call an accessory or adventitious bursa is found under the heel spur, and it is removed as well. Postoperative recovery is usually a slipper cast and minimal weight bearing for a period of 3-4 weeks. On some occasions, a removable short-leg walking boot is used or a below knee cast applied.

Prevention

To prevent this condition, wearing shoes with proper arches and support is very important. Proper stretching is always a necessity, especially when there is an increase in activities or a change in running technique. It is not recommended to attempt working through the pain, as this can change a mild case of heel spurs and plantar fascitis into a long lasting and painful episode of this condition.

Natural Home Remedies On Heel Spur That You Should Know

A stress fracture on your heel, tarsal tunnel syndrome and bursitis are additional injuries that can cause significant heel pain, especially during walking or running. A stress fracture is a small crack in your heel bone and may develop due to over-training in high-impact activities such as running and jumping. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is when your nerve is compressed on the back of your ankle and heel, resulting in heel pain and numbness or tingling. Lastly, bursitis is inflammation of your bursa sac – a sac of fluid located underneath tendons to reduce friction. When tendons such as your Achilles tendon become tight and inflamed, you may develop bursitis.

It’s very difficult to answer your question without knowing more about your friend’s condition. For example, how long has your friend been experiencing symptoms? Has he sought a second opinion? Has he tried other treatments? While it’s impossible to hypothesize treatment options for your friend without more information, there are some general recommendations to discuss that might shed some light on the situation. Namely, that the great majority of individuals with heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, and other types of heel pain are able to resolve discomfort without surgery or other intensive or invasive treatments. In fact, 90-95% of heel spur patients are able to resolve pain without surgery.

When it comes to treatment options, the approach implemented on plantar fasciitis is also the same one applied in heel spur The best and most effective way to address the onset of heel spur is to rest. You have to spend some time resting and keeping your feet in good condition. Rest is to give enough time to let the inflammation to recover. To do that, medications might be offered. Physical therapy and exercise are also crucial in order to rehabilitate the plantar fascia. When sleeping, night splints are necessary to ensure that the fascia is stretched, ensuring that the individual will have less recurring pains in the morning. heel spur relief

Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent cause of chronic heel pain, leaving many sufferers unable to put their best foot forward for months at a time. Now a Mexican study suggests that physicians should turn to Botox rather than steroids to offer patients the fastest road to recovery. The research appears in the journal Foot & Ankle International Plantar fasciitis results when connective tissues on the sole of the foot, the plantar fascia, become painfully inflamed. Physicians may suggest various therapies for this condition, including applying steroids, regular stretching exercises or injecting botulinum toxin A (BTX-A), also known as Botox

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome or PCOS is the condition where the hormones of a woman are not balanced. This is a very common syndrome that affects an average of 1 out 15 women. PCOS can cause irregular menstruation cycles and other related problems and this syndrome can make a woman have difficulty getting pregnant. The hormonal imbalance in a woman’s body can also cause superficial changes. An estimated 10 to 15 million men in the United States suffer from impotence, also known as erectile dysfunction. Some people also use the term impotence to describe other problems such as lack of sexual desire and the inability to ejaculate or have an orgasm.

Rest on your back and raise your aching feet so that they are at least a foot above your head. This will especially help if your aching feet are also puffy. While in this position, let yourself relax and take it easy. Hear some comforting music, or view your favored movie on television. Natural Treatments for Sportsmen’s Foot will work however you have to discover to keep your feet dry and your washroom floor clean and dry. And if you have persistent Athletes foot that you cannot heal go to your physician. About the Authorheel spur pictures

One particular really crucial suggestion for heel spur treatment is to reduce fat. Individuals who are obese create a lot a lot more pressure on their lessen extremities. Their legs and feet have to bear the major excess weight of their body. If a particular person weighs about 200 lbs or extra, they are a lot more likely to build a calcaneal spur Losing excess weight is not only superior for the feet. It is also helpful to your general overall health and bodily condition. Treatment for plantar fasciitis is usually conservative in nature. Rest, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, padding, alternative shoe gear, arch supports, orthotics, stretching exercises usually improve the condition.

Posted May 29, 2014 by tadlinstrom in Heel Spur